South Portland Psychologists - Maine

We have found 13 listings in South Portland, ME that matched your search criteria.

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Psychologists in, close to, nearby or around South Portland
Carol Lynn Kabacoff
(207) 899-4105
6 D St, South Portland, ME 4106
Susan Steinman Lcpc
(207) 799-5065
131 Ocean St, South Portland, ME 4106
Peters Anne Lcsw
(207) 799-0092
131 Ocean St, South Portland, ME 4106
Howaniec Barbara Psychotherapi
(207) 240-8995
460 Main St, South Portland, ME 4106
Peter Donnelly
(207) 767-7001
6 D St, South Portland, ME 4106
Debra Wallett Psychologis
(207) 799-5100
131 Ocean St, South Portland, ME 4106
Unger Lynne
(207) 799-9198
345 Cottage Rd, South Portland, ME 4106
St Thomas, Bruce
(207) 772-4789
545 Westbrook St, South Portland, ME 4106
Phd Jonathan Psychologist Birnberg
(207) 775-2220
609 Main St, South Portland, ME 4106
Christine J. Cooke Ph.D.
(207) 332-3872
254 Cottage Rd, South Portland, ME 4106
Nicoloff Lee Katherine Ph
(207) 799-1441
884 Broadway, South Portland, ME 4106
Moll Judith Lcsw
(207) 767-2500
345 Cottage Rd, South Portland, ME 4106
Claiborn James PhD
(207) 799-0408
6 D St, South Portland, ME 4106
Featured Article

Improve Self-Esteem and Relationships - Psychologist Explains Use of the Binocular Trick

by: Gerald Solfanelli

People naturally want their thoughts, feelings, and experiences to be consistent. If someone interviews for a job, for example, that pays them more than they thought that they would ever earn (even though they are capable of and deserving of the job), their thought that they are incapable is inconsistent with their experience of being offered the interview. Ultimately, they will likely feel very nervous about the interview. As a result of this anxiety and worry, they will not likely interview well. Therefore, they will likely be rejected for the job. This rejection can be internalized as "proof" that they are undeserving, thereby added to their lower sense of self and self-esteem.

Immediately after their aforementioned rejection, their initial anxiety will likely ease, because their experience (getting rejected) is now consistent with their untrue thought (that they are not deserving). Nonetheless, they will likely continue to feel inferior and earn less money. The true reality, however, is that they were and are capable. As they understand this truth (no matter the etiology of the original belief) both in how he/she thinks and feels about themselves, they will perform much better in the future. This improved performance (based upon this change in perception and healthy understanding) will likely lead to ongoing approval and acceptance. This positive experience will likely lead to an overall improved sense of self, self-esteem, self-confidence, and self-image.

Another common "cognitive distortion," as described by Dr. David Burns' popularized information on cognitive behavioral therapy, that influences self-esteem is known as the "binocular trick." If one has ever looked into a pair of binoculars the wrong way, everything looks far away. In essence, people sometimes use this phenomenon upon themselves, while comparing themselves with others. One might look at one's own accomplishments as if through the wrong end of a pair of binoculars. Conversely, one may examine another's accomplishments as if through the right way through the same binoculars. When looking at one's shortcomings, there may be a tendency to examine these deficits as if looking at them properly though binoculars. On the other hand, others' shortcomings are examined in the opposite way.

Since most publicly embellish personal strengths, while minimizing weaknesses, the etiology of this discrepancy becomes self-evident. When comparing out, it is ultimately vital to remember that our self-knowledge far exceeds our understanding of others. This imbalanced perspective creates an illusion that can be overcome, therefore, by means of an awareness of the role of the binocular trick and the realization that everyone has his or her own set of shortcomings and strengths.

http://www.ThePsychologist.com

Gerald Solfanelli is a Pennsylvania licensed psychologist and certified hypnotherapist in full-time private practice. As a presenter for PESI, he provides national continuing education workshops for mental health and educational professionals. He also hosts his professional website that helps visitors simplify their overall healthcare, by improving their emotional health with psychology-related links, best-selling e-books, hypnosis and other FREE self-help programs. You can also visit his site for more information cognitive behavioral therapy.

(c) Copyright 2008 - Psychologist Gerald A. Solfanelli. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

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