Johnson City Psychologists - Tennessee

We have found 19 listings in Johnson City, TN that matched your search criteria.

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Psychologists in, close to, nearby or around Johnson City
Neuro Behavorial Associates
(423) 434-2620
2 Worth Cir, Johnson City, TN 37601
Cherokee Educational Consultants
(423) 926-6404
207 N Boone St, Johnson City, TN 37604
Heather L Beaudry Phd
(423) 282-0164
2 Worth Cir, Johnson City, TN 37601
Psi Psychological Services
(423) 282-1533
904 Sunset Dr, Johnson City, TN 37604
John W Thurman Phd
(423) 979-0301
300 E Main St, Johnson City, TN 37601
Jon B Ellis Phd
(423) 282-8182
206 Princeton Rd, Johnson City, TN 37601
Robert E Roth
(423) 952-0500
208 Sunset Dr Ste 404, Johnson City, TN 37604
New Day Psychological Services
(423) 929-0000
4000 Glaze Rd, Johnson City, TN 37601
Psychological Consulting Services
(423) 928-8001
112 E Myrtle Ave Ste 508, Johnson City, TN 37601
Podiatric Associates
(423) 929-2725
1303 Sunset Dr Ste 6, Johnson City, TN 37604
John S Auerbach Phd
(423) 434-9109
409 E Watauga Ave, Johnson City, TN 37601
Dan Hammer Lcpt Lmft
(423) 434-2964
525 N State Of Franklin Rd, Johnson City, TN 37604
Rodney A Sullivan
(423) 952-0992
2 Worth Cir, Johnson City, TN 37601
Donald G Hiers Phd
(423) 434-0041
112 E Myrtle Ave, Johnson City, TN 37601
William M Hensley
(423) 928-2442
313 W Fairview Ave, Johnson City, TN 37604
Thomas E Schacht
(423) 929-1076
614 W Locust St, Johnson City, TN 37604
Spangler And Associates, Llc
(423) 929-9034
207 N Boone St Ste 1400, Johnson City, TN 37604
Tedd A Edd Stephens
(423) 928-1379
315 N State Of Franklin Rd, Johnson City, TN 37604
Susan Taub Phd
(423) 928-2222
1604 E Oakland Ave, Johnson City, TN 37601
Featured Article

Improve Self-Esteem and Relationships - Psychologist Explains Use of the Binocular Trick

by: Gerald Solfanelli

People naturally want their thoughts, feelings, and experiences to be consistent. If someone interviews for a job, for example, that pays them more than they thought that they would ever earn (even though they are capable of and deserving of the job), their thought that they are incapable is inconsistent with their experience of being offered the interview. Ultimately, they will likely feel very nervous about the interview. As a result of this anxiety and worry, they will not likely interview well. Therefore, they will likely be rejected for the job. This rejection can be internalized as "proof" that they are undeserving, thereby added to their lower sense of self and self-esteem.

Immediately after their aforementioned rejection, their initial anxiety will likely ease, because their experience (getting rejected) is now consistent with their untrue thought (that they are not deserving). Nonetheless, they will likely continue to feel inferior and earn less money. The true reality, however, is that they were and are capable. As they understand this truth (no matter the etiology of the original belief) both in how he/she thinks and feels about themselves, they will perform much better in the future. This improved performance (based upon this change in perception and healthy understanding) will likely lead to ongoing approval and acceptance. This positive experience will likely lead to an overall improved sense of self, self-esteem, self-confidence, and self-image.

Another common "cognitive distortion," as described by Dr. David Burns' popularized information on cognitive behavioral therapy, that influences self-esteem is known as the "binocular trick." If one has ever looked into a pair of binoculars the wrong way, everything looks far away. In essence, people sometimes use this phenomenon upon themselves, while comparing themselves with others. One might look at one's own accomplishments as if through the wrong end of a pair of binoculars. Conversely, one may examine another's accomplishments as if through the right way through the same binoculars. When looking at one's shortcomings, there may be a tendency to examine these deficits as if looking at them properly though binoculars. On the other hand, others' shortcomings are examined in the opposite way.

Since most publicly embellish personal strengths, while minimizing weaknesses, the etiology of this discrepancy becomes self-evident. When comparing out, it is ultimately vital to remember that our self-knowledge far exceeds our understanding of others. This imbalanced perspective creates an illusion that can be overcome, therefore, by means of an awareness of the role of the binocular trick and the realization that everyone has his or her own set of shortcomings and strengths.

http://www.ThePsychologist.com

Gerald Solfanelli is a Pennsylvania licensed psychologist and certified hypnotherapist in full-time private practice. As a presenter for PESI, he provides national continuing education workshops for mental health and educational professionals. He also hosts his professional website that helps visitors simplify their overall healthcare, by improving their emotional health with psychology-related links, best-selling e-books, hypnosis and other FREE self-help programs. You can also visit his site for more information cognitive behavioral therapy.

(c) Copyright 2008 - Psychologist Gerald A. Solfanelli. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

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